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Unlocking financial secrets for different phases of life

All / 22.10.2020

Unlocking financial secrets for different phases of life

One of the keys to financial success is to adopt the right strategy at the right time. As you move through the stages of life here are some tried and tested ‘secrets’ that will help you build and protect your wealth.

Teens and young adults

Time is on your side so get saving. Through the magic of compound interest, a little bit invested now can grow into a big amount over time. Most young people don’t want to think about life in 50 years time, but if a 15-year-old starts saving just $10 per week into an investment returning 5% pa (after fees and tax), when they turn 65 their total outlay of $26,000 will have grown to over $116,000. Contributing those savings to a tax-favoured vehicle such as superannuation may provide an even higher final return.

Single life

Saving is still a key strategy as careers are established, but usually with a shorter timeframe and a specific purpose in mind – buying a home, for example. This is a time when savings strategies can be brought undone by the allure of desirable things and the ease with which one can go into debt. Take care not to indulge in too many luxuries, and avoid taking on any high interest debt, such as credit cards. Rather, commit to the rather boring, but highly effective ‘secret’ of working out a budget and sticking to it.

Family focus

The time of kids and mortgages is also the time of peak responsibility. It’s likely that your most valuable asset is your ability to earn an income, and illness, disability or death could deprive you and your family of that income. The financial consequences of each of these possibilities can be managed with a blend of income protection, total and permanent disability, trauma and life insurances.

Preparing for retirement

With offspring launched into the world and earning capacity often at a peak, a wealth of opportunities open up for pre-retirees. By all means enjoy some lifestyle spending, but don’t forget to supercharge your super in anticipation of a long retirement. For additional tax benefits, look at making salary sacrifice contributions, perhaps combined with a transition to retirement strategy. In times of normal interest rates, using surplus income to pay off any outstanding home loan is often recommended. However, when interest rates are very low, investing spare income into super and leaving debt repayments until later may deliver a better outcome.

Golden years

Australians are up there with the leaders when it comes to enjoying long and healthy retirements. That means retirement savings need to last, so a): don’t go too hard too fast in spending your hard-earned super, and b): don’t invest too conservatively, particularly in times of ultra low interest rates. On the plus side, if you’ve employed the above secrets in each phase of life, you should be in good shape to enjoy a long, financially comfortable retirement.

Whatever your stage of life, there are many things you could be doing to secure your financial future. To find out more, talk to your financial adviser.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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5 simple steps to correct your credit score

All / 15.10.2020

5 simple steps to correct your credit score

If you’ve ever had a mobile phone, a credit card or any kind of finance – including a gas or electricity account – you’ll have a credit score.

Lenders check your credit score when assessing loan applications – the better your score, the more likely they are to lend to you.

Your score is based on factors such as:

  • money borrowed,
  • accounts like phone, utilities, etc.,
  • on time/overdue payments,
  • past credit applications.

The higher your score the better; you’re more likely to have loan applications approved and may be able to bargain a better deal.

Conversely, a low score can influence a lender against you, making it difficult to secure a loan or credit.

Finding out your credit score is easy and free. The government’s MoneySmart website provides details for reputable companies that can supply you with a copy of your credit report.

What if you find out your credit score is not looking too good?

Here are five things you can do to improve it.

1.Firstly, what’s the story? Get a copy of your credit report. It shows things like:

  • credit products and providers,
  • credit limits,
  • repayment history,
  • bankruptcy and debt arrangements.

Ensure your details are accurate and up-to-date and contact the reporting agency to have errors rectified.

Now, review the information. Are there trends? Perhaps you’re paying bills according to your wage cycle even if that means being a few days late?

2. Consolidate multiple cards and/or loans into one and cancel cards where possible. Fewer loan facilities are more manageable; it also looks better on your report.

Avoid applying for credit increases as any increase will add to your total credit debt. Additionally, applications for credit, and credit increases, are included in credit score calculations.

3. Consider a nil-interest balance transfer. This is where you transfer your outstanding credit card balance to a new card offering zero interest for a limited time. Schemes like these enable you to quickly pay down debt during the interest-free period, but make sure you’re clear about the terms and conditions as penalties can apply.

4. Where possible, reduce your credit card limits. Pay the full balance each month, or pay more than the monthly minimum when you can. Even the smallest amount can make a difference.

With personal loans, mortgages and council rates, pay on time – every time – and make additional payments whenever possible. Always pay rent and mobile phone accounts on time – it’s a recurring theme, isn’t it!

If you struggle to pay utilities by the due date, contact your provider. Many offer plans called bill-smoothing, where you pay a set amount each month. Goodbye bill-shock!

5. Create a realistic budget based on your income and expenses, and include the due dates of your debts. This will help you synch your pay cycle with financial obligations. It will also identify any savings that you can use to pay extra on loans and cards.

A poor credit rating is not the end of the world, but repairing it can take time and discipline. If you’re not sure where to start, seek professional advice. It’s all about managing debt, prioritising and making your credit score work for you.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Positioning your portfolio in turbulent times

All / 08.10.2020

Positioning your portfolio in turbulent times

As any experienced investor knows, all investment markets have their ups and downs. Regardless of investor experience, turbulent times are a cause of anxiety, and that can lead to poor decision-making. So if turbulent markets are inevitable, even if their timing is not predictable, how should portfolios be positioned in anticipation of, and in response to market volatility?

What’s your objective?

First up, it’s important to go back to your investment objective. Is it to grow wealth over the medium to long term? Or are you more concerned with preserving capital? Your objective also needs to take account of your risk profile. How would you feel if, for example, the value of your portfolio dropped by 20%? Would it lead to you dumping volatile investments such as shares, or would you see it as an opportunity to pick up some quality shares at a discount?

With your risk tolerance and objectives clarified, it’s time to get to grips with asset allocation. This is the process of deciding what proportion of your portfolio will be allocated to each of the major asset classes: cash, fixed interest, property and shares. Some investors will also allocate some funds to investments such as gold and absolute return funds – managed investment funds that seek to make a profit from both rising and falling markets.

Asset allocation is the engine room of your portfolio. The amount that you apportion to the major asset classes has the biggest effect on your portfolio performance. It has a greater bearing on your returns than individual asset selection.

Asset allocation is also your key risk management tool as it determines the level of diversification across asset classes whose values may move reasonably independently of each other. The more you allocate to shares and property the greater the volatility, and therefore the risk. However, in this context, risk isn’t always a bad thing. A higher risk portfolio may at times fall more in value than a lower risks portfolio, but over the long term it is also more likely to generate higher returns.

Oops, too late

Unfortunately, the motivation to position a portfolio for turbulent times is often a sudden upset in investment markets. But this doesn’t mean it’s too late to do anything. If your investment objectives and risk tolerance haven’t changed, rebalancing your portfolio (i.e. bringing the asset allocation back to its ideal position) may help to position your portfolio for the next upswing in investment markets.

Waiting out the storms

While positioning can help with portfolio risk management, many investors opt to wait out any storms. Why? Because for all the ups and downs, bull markets and bear markets, bubbles and crashes, major share markets have delivered solid long-term growth. In fact, it has been claimed that investors have lost more money trying to anticipate corrections than they would have lost in riding out actual corrections.

A detached view

Concerned about the financial outlook and your portfolio’s current position? Your financial planner can provide a dispassionate and impartial assessment of your portfolio, help you identify your objectives and understand your risk tolerance, and recommend investments to help you weather the turbulent times.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

 

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Is this insurance cover necessary?

All / 01.10.2020

Is this insurance cover necessary?

Consumer credit insurance, also called loan or mortgage protection insurance, helps you meet repayments on a mortgage, personal loan, credit card or other loan contract if you lose your job, cannot work due to illness or injury, or die. It may also cover theft of your credit card or even replacement of faulty goods you have purchased with a credit card.

It’s often sold when the loan or credit card is set up but it’s your choice, as a borrower, to decide if you want or need this cover. Many people have it without knowing, so it’s worth checking your loan contracts to see if you are covered – and what you are paying for it.

Mortgage protection insurance should not be confused with lenders’ mortgage insurance (LMI). This insurance is compulsory if you are borrowing more than 80% of the value of a property. Its purpose is to protect the lender if you can’t repay your home loan and your home is subsequently repossessed.

Who does it protect?

Claims under consumer credit insurance are paid directly to your lender, not to you, so your financial institution could be viewed as the main beneficiary. However, by taking at least some of the burden of making payments off your shoulders, it does provide borrowers with some protection.

How much protection depends on the policy and the type of claim made. For example, a claim resulting from involuntary unemployment may only cover loan repayments for six to twelve months. After that, you’ll need to recommence making payments. Or policies may not cover the full amount of the outstanding debt, leaving you liable for the remainder.

Is it really necessary?

Consumer credit insurance has a reputation for being both expensive and limited in the cover it provides. You therefore need to weigh up the costs and benefits very carefully. It isn’t compulsory, remember, and putting the premiums towards other forms of insurance may be a better choice.

What are the alternatives?

Standard life, disability and income protection insurances may provide much cheaper protection than consumer credit insurance. And as benefit payments are made directly to you or your family they can be used for more than just debt repayment. Many people have a default level of life and income protection insurance through their superannuation funds, though often not enough to provide adequate cover, particularly when taking on significant debt. It’s therefore important to check that any insurance you have provides enough cover to meet your needs.

It’s also important to be aware that income protection insurance only pays out if illness or injury prevents you from working. In most cases it doesn’t cover unemployment, so this is one area where consumer credit insurance may be an appropriate option. Although even here there may be alternatives, such as using equity in your home to pay off credit card debt.

Coming up with the right mix of insurances to protect you and your family from a range of financial risks is a complex task. Your qualified financial adviser will be able to help you work out a plan that’s just right for you.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Be safe rather than sorry

All / 24.09.2020

Be safe rather than sorry

Not everyone will do it, but most people will consider it at some stage in their lives – borrowing to buy their very own home. It can be an exciting venture, but also a scary one if you don’t plan well.

Whether you are borrowing to buy your first home, or upgrade your existing property, it is imperative you take the necessary steps to ensure you do not borrow more than you can comfortably repay. You might think that’s blatantly obvious, but this can be an extremely emotional time and under such stress, sometimes common sense disappears.

You should be aware of your exact financial position, how much you can afford in repayments and have emergency plans to cater for contingencies such as increasing interest rates or changes in income.

A great idea is to keep income and expense records for a period before you take out a new mortgage to track your cash flow movements. You might even have a trial run for a few months to prove that you really can set aside the full amount of your planned repayments without too much pain.

Then, when it’s time to establish the loan, keep in mind the following…

  • Is the interest rate the lowest available?
  • Are the features of the loan right for you? Don’t pay extra for features you do not need.
  • If rates are increasing, consider having a fixed rate for at least part of the loan, this will give you some protection.
  • Don’t borrow more than you are sure you are able to repay. (This might seem obvious but if you are tempted to borrow more to buy a “nicer” house, remember it could cause you pain later.)
  • Allow for unforeseen emergencies such as ill health or unemployment. Take out income protection insurance to cover your income against sickness or accidents.
  • Make sure you won’t have obvious major expenses coming up, such as replacing your car, before you commit to a mortgage.

Once you have enjoyed the excitement of moving into your new home you may need to forgo new luxury items until you have significantly reduced the level of your mortgage. A golden rule is to never take on further debt, such as adding non-essential items to your credit card, early in your mortgage. If you plan an expensive holiday or a new car, it is best to save for these as a special project.

We can guide you through the mortgage maze and help you determine how much you can safely borrow, and the best mortgage and features to suit your circumstances.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

 

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Are you investing or gambling?

All / 17.09.2020

Are you investing or gambling?

The potential financial results of investing can feel limitless, and it can be tempting to think that just one stock pick could make you an overnight millionaire. Yes, stock-picking can have a place in your investment strategy, but if you’re focused on the allure of a “get rich quick” mentality, you may be gambling, not investing.

What’s the difference?

One of the key differences between investing and gambling is process and strategy. If you don’t have a process and strategy in place, it is a sign that you need to establish or refine your plan.

Further, gambling focuses on emotions such as hope. Investing, on the other hand, is all about strategy. With a clear strategy, you know approximately how much your investments will grow and over what time horizons.

How do you know if you’re investing effectively?

If you’re unsure whether your current investment approach is working to realise your goals, think about your investment process and how many of the below five elements are included in your approach.

Completing no research

If you’re not completing any research and putting money into assets based on tips from friends or what you see on social media, you’re exposing yourself to increased risk and not doing enough due diligence.

Investing in micro-cap stocks only

Micro-cap stocks typically have a market capitalisation under $500 million and are ranked from 350 to 600 on the Australian Stock Exchange. With a relatively small market capitalisation, buying stocks in these companies can be cheap. The downside, however, is that these companies are usually in their infancy and experience volatile price fluctuations. There’s a place for micro-cap stocks in your investing. However, if you’re putting all of your money into these companies, you’re likely exposing yourself to unnecessary risk.

Investing with short time horizons

Putting all of your money into short-term investments or activities such as day trading is an indication that you’re too focused on short-term gains without a long-term strategy. There’s a place for short time horizons in your investing, but only once you’ve mastered the foundations such as establishing a long-term plan and ensuring you have adequate cash buffers.

Lack of diversification

If all of your money is invested in one asset class, you’ll be over-exposed to volatility in a single market. To ensure your money grows consistently over time, your money needs to be balanced across a range of asset classes and sectors.

Having no investment strategy

If you don’t have an investment strategy, your investing won’t be as effective as it could be. To start putting together an investment strategy, you need to think about things such as:

  • building up adequate cash buffers;
  • how much money you need invested to live comfortably off your returns; and
  • when you anticipate you’ll start drawing an income from your investments.

Moving forward with a long-term wealth strategy

Investing in different asset classes such as equities, commodities, and fixed-income assets is a great way to build long-term wealth. To build this wealth, however, you need a strategy and process to follow.

If you’re unsure how to develop an investment strategy, be sure to seek qualified financial advice. Investing in this advice now can reap great rewards in the years to come, ensuring your money is working to help you realise your financial and lifestyle goals sooner.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Three steps to your kids’ financial success

All / 10.09.2020

Three steps to your kids’ financial success

For many of us, our first experience of banking and savings was the school Savings Account Program.

But in 2019 the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) raised concerns that these accounts had little lasting impact on children’s savings behaviour.

All parents want their children to be better-off than they were – more secure and financially independent, but the big question remains: where do you start?

Ushering your children toward financial security can be a simple three-step process.

Step 1: Create good habits

Start early; learning to save is one of life’s great lessons. In an increasingly cash-less society, it can be difficult for children to understand the value of money and how to save.

Help them by:

  • Providing a piggy bank for very young children, or a glass jar through which they can see their savings mounting up.
  • Teaching the difference between needs and wants. Lead by example with your own savings habits.
  • Involving them in the household budget; compare prices at the supermarket and demonstrate bill-paying.
  • Paying pocket money for age-appropriate chores and helping them to create a mini-budget, apportioning money to:
    • spending on anything they want.
    • donating to charity to instil a sense of community and empathy,
    • saving for a goal; helpful in teaching kids restraint and how to avoid impulse buys.

Step 2: Inform

Nothing is free; water in the tap, electricity and even the internet don’t just happen by magic. One of the best ways to teach kids about responsible money handling is to explain debt and the consequences for not meeting financial obligations, which segues neatly into a discussion about personal credit scores.

People with better credit scores find seeking finance approval easier and often qualifies them for more advantageous lending deals and better interest rates.

Helping kids understand the concept of a credit score can be a little daunting, so try these tips:

  • Brush up on your knowledge first.
  • Don’t focus on numbers, explain that it’s about financial behaviour over time.
  • Avoid complexity and keep the information age-relevant.
  • Use examples. Discuss mistakes you’ve made in the past, explain how you rectified them.

Step 3: Consider where you’re saving

Record-low interest rates have taken the fun out of savings, but don’t let that stop your kids from calculating how much they can earn from the right type of account. The Moneysmart website has savings calculators that kids can play with and learn from.

The banking and finance industry offers a plethora of accounts specifically designed to encourage kids to save. Help them research the account that will suit them; consider fees and interest.
Additionally, searching online will reveal a range of websites, blogs and apps dedicated to engaging and educating kids about money and savings.

Introduce your kids to good habits while they’re young, and you’ll be setting them up for success.

Finding the most child-appropriate plans and accounts that specifically suit your child’s needs can be a minefield. Your financial adviser will be happy to work with you as you guide your children into a financially secure future.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

 

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Economic and Investment Update Webinar – Recording

All / 07.09.2020

Economic and Investment Update Webinar – Recording

Forecasting in the time of coronavirus

The global COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc across the global economy in terms of human cost, curtailed economic activity, and disrupted financial markets. Even as some countries succeed in controlling the outbreak, the case count continues to grow globally, casting a shadow on the global economic outlook in 2020 and beyond.

TNRWealth hosted a webinar on Thursday 3 September at 5.45pm, featuring Vanguard Asia Pacific Economist, Beatrice Yeo as she outlined the bumpy road to recovery for the Australian and Global economy, as well as forecasts for the financial markets.

Topics discussed included:

  • Global economic outlook
  • The road to recovery post coronavirus pandemic
  • Financial market returns

To watch a recording of this webinar please click on the following link:

 

 

 

To view Vanguard’s Client Friendly Quarterly economic & market update report

 

 

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Financial pearls of wisdom

All / 03.09.2020

Financial pearls of wisdom

As we approach retirement some people start to panic a little wondering if they are truly looking forward to the time of their life when they no longer have to work. All of a sudden something they have been pining for is becoming real!

Instead of worrying, have a read of the following tips and if necessary, act now. After all, it’s your future – and it could be here sooner than you think.

1: What do you want and how will you get it?

What are your goals and objectives for your retirement? Write out a plan that sees you enjoying the fruits of your labours. Then make sure your finances can achieve your goals. If not, do something about it now while you still have time. Be realistic and set achievable timeframes.

2: It’s not just about returns; remember the risks

Every investment has some degree of risk. Cash is considered the safest as there’s a good chance your money will still be in the bank when you need it. The downside is that it pays the lowest return; it isn’t tax effective; and doesn’t tend to keep pace with inflation. To achieve higher returns and make your money work harder, you need to take appropriate risk. Understand the differences between the various investment assets available and make your decisions wisely.

3: Share it around

To help reduce risk, share your investments across several asset classes – and within those asset classes as well. The right balance will depend on your financial objectives, the amount of time you have available to invest, and your risk tolerance.

4: Don’t forget super…

Superannuation will be your bank account when you are no longer working so you should be considering ways to boost your superannuation balance prior to retirement. But be aware the tax benefits are not always equal so make sure you have a balance of inside-super and outside-super investments.

5: …or tax

Tax is the trickiest area of all. Always make sure you get good advice on investing tax-effectively. A simple restructure of an underlying asset, investment vehicle or ownership structure can help you to minimise the amount of tax you pay and maximise your after-tax return.

6: Retirement can last another lifetime

With medical technology and improved lifestyles we are living much longer than previous generations. The older you get, the longer you’re likely to live. Being prepared for a longer retirement means that your money must last longer, so don’t be too conservative with your investments.

7: Stay cool

You are in this for the long term so when markets fluctuate and investments unexpectedly fall in value, don’t panic and sell. Sit down with your adviser, review your portfolio and stay focused on your long-term goals and objectives.

8: Keep learning

You are never too old to learn. Financial advisers have an important role in giving you tailored guidance, but you still need to make your own informed decisions about your financial plan. Make sure you understand everything and if not, ask us questions or do some research.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Invite to an Economic and Investment Update Webinar

All / 01.09.2020

Invite to an Economic and Investment Update Webinar

On behalf of TNR Wealth Management and Vanguard invites you to an exclusive webcast on the economic situation today.

Forecasting in the time of coronavirus

The global COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc across the global economy in terms of human cost, curtailed economic activity, and disrupted financial markets. Even as some countries succeed in controlling the outbreak, the case count continues to grow globally, casting a shadow on the global economic outlook in 2020 and beyond.

Join us for a special webinar on Thursday 3 September at 5.45pm, featuring Vanguard Asia Pacific Economist, Beatrice Yeo as she outlines the bumpy road to recovery for the Australian and Global economy, as well as forecasts for the financial markets.

Topics they’ll discuss include:

  • Global economic outlook
  • The road to recovery post coronavirus pandemic
  • Financial market returns

To register your attendance, click on the following link:

 

 

To view Vanguard’s Client Friendly Quarterly economic & market update report

 

 

Click on the below box to sign into the Webinar. Passcode is 139159.

 

 

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6626 3000.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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