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Is paying your mortgage off quicker really the best option?

All / 23.01.2020

Is paying your mortgage off quicker really the best option?

Not so long ago one of the most effective, low risk wealth creation strategies was to use spare savings to pay down a mortgage, either directly or via the well disciplined use of an offset account. If your mortgage interest rate was 8% per annum, that’s the effective, after tax investment return this strategy delivered, substantially reducing the term of the loan and delivering big savings on interest.

But what about now? With home loans being offered at interest rates of less than 4% pa, does using surplus savings to pay off the mortgage still make sense? Or is it better to contribute those savings to an investment that may provide higher returns? Let’s see what we can learn from Emma’s situation.

Emma is a 45-year old, single professional with a $200,000 mortgage on her home. The home loan interest rate is 3.4% pa, and Emma’s marginal tax rate is 39%, including the Medicare levy.

Following a recent promotion, she has a savings capacity of $2,000 per month, plus annual bonuses. Her only other debt is $10,000 on her credit card with an interest rate of 20%. Emma has a healthy superannuation balance for her age, and does not want to contribute more to super.

So where to from here?

Although a relatively small amount in dollar terms, by virtue of its high interest rate the credit card debt should be cleared as soon as possible. The rules of managing high interest debt are simple: pay off the debt with the highest interest rate first, and work down to the lowest interest rate debt. If possible, consolidate all debt at the lowest interest rate. In Emma’s case, if she has the ability to redraw some funds against her home loan, she should do so to pay off the credit card.

Doing better

With the credit card completely paid off, Emma’s attention now turns to how to make the most of her savings ability. After looking around, she’s identified a number of investments that have consistently produced returns of more than 3.4% pa. Wouldn’t they be a better option than paying down the mortgage?

They may well be, but there are two important things that Emma needs to consider: tax and risk.

Tax

Extra payments made to the mortgage provide Emma with a net return, after tax, of 3.4%. But if Emma contributes her savings to a purely income paying investment, that income will be taxed at her marginal rate of 39%. To earn 3.4% after tax, Emma’s investments need to earn 5.6% pa before tax.

If Emma opts for investments that provide a mix of income and capital growth, such as shares and property, the tax situation becomes a bit more complicated. Tax on any capital gains isn’t paid until after the investments are sold, and if held for more than 12 months, Emma will benefit from the capital gains tax discount.

Even without these tax perks a targeted return of greater than 5.6% pa is one that Emma can realistically aim for, as long as she is comfortable with the risk.

Risk and return

A fundamental ‘law’ that investors can’t avoid is that higher returns come with higher risk. Paying off the mortgage is about as close to a risk free return that Emma could achieve. However, in the current environment, Emma may well feel that pursuing the higher returns from an investment strategy is well worth the greater risk.

What’s right for Emma isn’t necessarily right for everyone else. Age and stage of life, health and overall financial situation all influence the level of risk we may need or want to take on.

Is paying off the mortgage as quickly as possible the best option? It really depends on your situation. And it doesn’t need to be all or nothing. A blend of paying down debt and investing may provide a happy median.

Got some spare savings capacity? Your financial planner can help you work out a wealth creation strategy that’s right for you.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Work, life, travel – you can do it all!

All / 16.01.2020

Work, life, travel – you can do it all!

Michael was twenty-something and eager for adventure when he spotted the advertisement. It read, “Japanese schools seeking English teachers. No experience necessary – we train you.”

What followed changed Michael’s life forever as he successfully completed the organiser’s training program, and embarked on a year of living and working in Japan.

Many dream of escaping mundane work-lives by experiencing another country’s culture while earning a living.

In this age of internet connectivity, the work, life, travel proposition is very do-able. In fact, many of us already utilise video-conference technology to communicate and attend business meetings from home. Why can’t that home be in another country?

Maria is Greek and was living in Sydney with her Australian husband Peter when her elderly mother became ill. The couple visited Greece to care for Maria’s mum, and Peter was able to continue his Australian job via remote desktop connection.

Working remotely isn’t possible for everyone so we’ve rounded-up a few alternative jobs you can do while travelling the world.

Travel writing: Good with words? Write travel articles or blogs and get paid for sight-seeing and exploring new places.

Considerations: This highly competitive industry can be difficult to break into so have some cash behind you until you establish yourself. Stick to unusual or quirky locations; nobody needs another story about Rome’s Colosseum. Further, people rely on travel articles for their own holidays so write honestly. Provide insider tips and discuss risks.

Travel photography/video: Social media is a terrific showcase for your travel pics and videos. Team up with a writer, or write your own copy, to create travel blogs or narrated vlogs (video blogs).

Considerations: Photography and video tourism may be slow to start but opportunities include YouTube or Vimeo to present work. You might also think about publishing a coffee-table book once you’ve established a portfolio.

Housesitting: Get paid to mind peoples’ homes and care for their pets while they’re away.

Considerations: Housesitting opportunities are located via dedicated organisations like trustedhousesitters.com. You must provide a police check and references and pay a membership fee but you’ll be supported by the organisation as you travel the world. Housesitting doesn’t pay well but you’ll have no accommodation costs.

Hospitality: See the world through its hotels, restaurants and bars. Opportunities exist worldwide, particularly if you have food and beverage experience.

Considerations: Traditionally a rite-of-passage for school-leavers, these days, chefs, baristas and hoteliers are gaining creditable experience in international establishments.

Other considerations

Research and plan carefully before jetting off. For example:

  • Contact the consulate of your intended country to understand what Visas are required and their terms and conditions.
  • Many countries impose age restrictions for those taking a working holiday.
  • Even if you’re not a resident or citizen, income may be subject to tax in the country in which it’s earned. You should also speak to your accountant about your Australian tax and superannuation obligations, particularly if you’re working remotely on your Australian job.
  • Take out travel insurance. Earning money doesn’t automatically grant you access to a country’s medical scheme.
  • Update your will and consider nominating a power of attorney to manage your affairs back home.
  • Notify your bank, you’ll need some savings to get started, and keep a cash back-up for emergencies. Holiday jobs can be low-paying so expect to live pay-to-pay.
  • Check out overseas job sites; websites like Seek and Indeed list jobs worldwide.

Australians are an intrepid lot and we live in an age of endless opportunities to explore the world and live the work-life-travel dream.

Do your homework and plan carefully; your new adventure could be just over the horizon.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Four financial resolutions to kick start the new year

All / 09.01.2020

Four financial resolutions to kick start the new year

The dawn of a new year sees many people setting new year’s resolutions such as losing some weight or giving up smoking.

Similarly, the beginning of a new year is the ideal time for setting financial goals, and here are four practical ways you can kick your year off to a great start.

  1. Decide what you want to achieve. January is perfect for taking stock of where you’re at financially, particularly as those post-December bills start rolling in. So perhaps you’d like to start by paying off debt or commence a savings plan for a new car or family holiday. The main thing is to be decisive.
  2. Setting a realistic household budget will provide understanding of your finances and identify areas of unnecessary spending. This will not only assist in balancing your income and expenses, but will help you clear debt and allocate money to other financial goals like setting up an emergency cash fund.
  3. Tidy up your filing cabinet. According to the Australian Taxation Office, you should keep financial records for five years. Shred financial paperwork older than five years and file everything else, including bills, invoices and bank statements. Remember that any filing system you implement should be quickly and easily maintained so you’re motivated to keep your records in order.
  4. Review your paperwork; start with insurances – life insurance, house, car etc. Are they current and are you adequately covered? Are your premiums appropriate for your level of cover?

Assess your superannuation and nomination of beneficiary. Is your will up to date or have your circumstances changed?

While we’re experiencing record-low interest rates, do a few sums and work out whether you’re getting the best deal on your mortgage. Perhaps it’s time to renegotiate with your lender!

While the idea of setting a new year’s resolution is common, sticking to resolutions and accomplishing them are less so.

The key to achieving any goal is to be SMART about it:

S – be Specific. Clearly define your goal.

M – ensure it’s Measurable so you know when you’ve achieved it.

A – make it Achievable. Planning to complete a marathon in February may not be achievable if you’ve never run before.

R – be Realistic; could you really lose 20 kilos in a month?

T –set a time by which you want to achieve your goal.

If you’re not sure where to start, your financial planner or accountant can help you put processes in place to get your SMART goals underway.

With a little planning and organisation, being clear about what you want to achieve, and mapping out how and by when you expect to achieve it, you’ll be giving yourself the best possible start to a successful year.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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5 ways to benefit from record low interest rates

All / 19.12.2019

5 ways to benefit from record low interest rates

Interest rates have never been lower, and it’s possible they might fall even further. This creates opportunities for householders and businesses, so how can you best take advantage of low interest rates?

1. Pay off your debt more quickly

By maintaining constant repayments as interest rates fall, you’ll reduce the time it takes to pay off your loan. That’s because interest will make up less of each repayment, with more going to reduce the outstanding capital. And the great thing is that to take advantage of this strategy you don’t need to do anything. Lenders usually maintain repayments after each drop in interest rates unless you instruct them otherwise.

2. Refinance your home loan

Lenders vary in the extent to which they pass on cuts in official interest rates. So if you want to reduce your loan repayments it might be worth shopping around to see if you can find a better deal from other lenders. Just make sure that, if switching lenders, you take all fees into account to be certain you really are saving money.
If you are restructuring your borrowing another thing to consider is fixing the interest rate on all or part of your loan. This can provide protection from the impact of rising interest rates in the future, though it may mean you benefit less from any further cuts in rates. However, with interest rates already very low, there simply isn’t the room for rates to fall much further.

3. Buy a first home – or upgrade

Low interest rates create opportunities for first homebuyers to get a toehold in the property market, and for existing homeowners to upgrade to a bigger home or better location. While lower interest rates can be a bit of a two-edged sword, as they tend to drive up property prices, most people are happier borrowing in a low rate environment rather than when rates are high.

4. Borrow to invest

While Australians love to invest in property, borrowing to invest in shares is also a viable wealth creation strategy. Often referred to as gearing, the key to successfully investing borrowed funds is that the total returns must exceed the total costs. As the most significant cost is usually the interest on the loan, low rates make this strategy more attractive.
Take care, however. Gearing can magnify investment returns, but it can also increase your losses. It’s therefore important that you fully understand investment risk and how to minimise it.

5. Expand your business

The whole point of a reduction in interest rates is to stimulate the economy, and that includes encouraging business owners to invest in their enterprises. Low interest rates make it cheaper to borrow to buy equipment to increase productivity, to take on more staff, or buy out a competitor and generally expand the business.

Take advice

Some of these strategies are simple ‘no-brainers’. Others involve significant levels of risk. To take a closer look at how you can make the most of low interest rates, talk to your financial adviser.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Happy Holidays!

All / 19.12.2019

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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How the world celebrates Christmas

All / 19.12.2019

How the world celebrates Christmas

Beyond the rush of shopping, parties and the anticipation of holidays, Christmas still has the power to bring people together in the spirit of goodwill.

The practice of exchanging gifts has become traditional around the world and an essential ingredient of Christmas for millions of people around the world. Gift-giving may have originated with the story of the Three Wise Men who brought gold, frankincense and myrrh to Jesus, but it was also linked to St Nicholas, who evolved in many European countries into Santa Claus.

In different cultures around the world, the Christmas season is celebrated in a variety of ways.

  • In Britain, groups of serenaders called “waits” travelled from house to house, singing carols. These 19th century “songs of joy” are still among today’s most beloved Christmas music.
  • Ethiopians still follow the old Julian calendar and celebrate Christmas on the original date of 7th January usually by going to church.
  • In Japan Christmas is a time to spread happiness rather than a religious celebration. It is actually more like our Valentine’s Day for the young Japanese. As so few Japanese are Christian, Christmas Day is not a national holiday in Japan.
  • Christmas is known as Yule in Iceland and was first celebrated in ancient times as the winter solstice. The first recorded Christmas or Yule tree in Iceland was in 1862. As there were no evergreen trees growing in Iceland at that time, Icelanders made Yule trees using a central pole with branches attached to it and painted green.
  • In Venezuela Christmas is an extremely colourful event with fireworks being a popular way to celebrate. It is customary for Venezuelans to exchange presents at midnight on Christmas Eve. Christmas fare includes ‘Hallacas’ which is a mixture of beef, pork, chicken, capers, raisins, and olives is wrapped in leaves creating a parcel for boiling or steaming.

All of these different traditions have one thing in common… they bring families and friends together in a time of love and acceptance.

Joyeux Noel. Feliz Navidad. Froehliche Weihnachten. Sung Tan Chuk Ha. Een Plesiergiege Kerfees… or in other words, “Merry Christmas”!

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Why seeing a financial adviser could be your best Christmas gift

All / 12.12.2019

Why seeing a financial adviser could be your best Christmas gift

The run-up to Christmas is usually a hectic time. Aside from the shopping and Christmas parties, there are deadlines to meet, loose ends to tie up and, for many farmers, the last of the crop to harvest.

Once the big day is over many of us are able to slip into a more relaxed mode, but as your focus turns to leftover turkey and pudding, or lounging on the beach, why not spare a thought for your financial situation? With everyone else relaxing, the Christmas holiday period can be an ideal time to check your finances and start the New Year with everything in order and heading in the right direction.

As their clients hit the beach, the holiday period is often a quieter time for the financial advisers who remain on deck. That’ll make it easier to see a busy adviser. And while there’s always plenty to do down on the farm, that post-harvest period may be the perfect time for farmers to sit down with their financial advisers.

If a rainy day puts a dampener on your holiday fun, why not dip into the filing cabinet and tidy up the paperwork? You may be able to get rid of old documents you no longer need (make sure you dispose of them securely), find new opportunities, or discover important things that you’ve overlooked. Is your cash working hard enough for you? Has your portfolio become unbalanced? Are your personal insurances all in order? Are you saving enough?

So why not make a Christmas resolution, to call your financial adviser and make an appointment to review your financial situation. You’ll come away well equipped with some New Year resolutions to keep your finances humming along for the year to come.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Being sensible with Buy Now Pay Later this silly season

All / 05.12.2019

Being sensible with Buy Now Pay Later this silly season

Move over debit and credit cards; consumers are flocking to Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) services. Afterpay, Zip Pay and several similar payment solutions allow shoppers to take home their goodies now while paying them off via a few weekly, fortnightly or monthly payments. There’s no interest payable as such, although fees are charged for late payments.

A survey by Mozo reveals that 30% of Australian adults have one or more BNPL accounts and we’re not afraid to use them. Afterpay, our most popular BNPL service, achieved sales of $4.3 billion across Australia and New Zealand in the 2019 financial year, nearly double its sales of the previous year. With the nation set to splurge around $25 billion on Christmas, it’s a safe bet that plenty of that spend will be by BNPL. But with 60% of those surveyed by Mozo admitting that BNPL lead them to buy things that they wouldn’t have otherwise, it begs the question: how to use this payment option sensibly during the silly season?

1. Set your limits.

Make sure you have a budget for your Christmas spend, and use it to help resist the temptation of impulse purchases.

2. Track your spending.

Don’t just track your BNPL spending. Make sure you review credit and debit card purchases, too. Are you staying within budget across all your spending methods?

3. Avoid fees.

Around one third of BNPL users have missed at least one payment. While late fees may seem modest, they can add up.

4. Don’t repay BNPL loans with a credit card.

If you don’t pay off your entire credit card bill within the interest-free period, adding your BNPL repayments to the card may see you paying a high rate of interest on your purchases. Better to use a debit card or direct debit from your bank account, and making sure there’s enough money in the account to meet payments.

5. Avoid BNPL if you’re saving for a home loan.

Lenders may look at your use of BNPL as a sign that you don’t have significant savings and are living from payday to payday. The lower your debt, of all types, the easier it will be to get a mortgage.

6. Have a happy festive season

Used wisely, BNPL can help you jingle your bells and put the merry in your Christmas. Just make sure you know what you’re signing up for and that you can meet all of the regular payments. Take care, and you’ll be able to enjoy the start of the New Year without a financial hangover.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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Retire at 65 but don’t retire your money

All / 05.12.2019

Retire at 65 but don’t retire your money

Australian retirees are facing a ‘double whammy’ when it comes to funding their retirement. On the one hand we, as a nation, are enjoying longer and healthier lives. On the other hand, record low interest rates have slashed the returns on the traditional bedrocks of post-retirement investment portfolios such as term deposits, cash management accounts and annuities.

A dilemma

This is the dilemma facing Dave and Linda. On the point of retirement these fit and active 65 year olds are looking forward to regular overseas travel while maintaining their comfortable lifestyle.

They estimate this will cost them $80,000 per year, to be funded from their combined retirement savings of $1 million. Both are in good health, and realise there’s a high likelihood that one or both of them could live well into their 90s.

Naturally, Dave and Linda’s first thought is about security and capital preservation. This leads them to look at investing their funds in a portfolio mainly comprising income-producing investments that will spare them from the volatility of share and property markets. However they quickly discover that, with interest rates so low, it will be difficult to achieve a return of just 3% per annum. A simple financial calculation shows that if they draw $80,000 each year from a portfolio with this low rate of return, the money will run out in just under 16 years. This strategy will see them barely make it into their 80s.

Time for a rethink

This highlights to Dave and Linda that longevity risk is as much of a threat as investment risk. To address the risk of outliving their money, Dave and Linda consider a portfolio that, while retaining some conservative investments, apportions most of their funds to a well-diversified range of growth assets including property, Australian and international shares, and some higher-yielding income funds. With an estimated return of 7% p.a., Dave and Linda’s money is calculated to last just over 30 years, seeing them well into their 90s.

Balancing the risks

Yes, a growth portfolio is, from an investment point of view, higher risk than a defensive or conservative portfolio. That is, it will be more volatile, rising and falling in value along with investment markets. Dave and Linda will need to accept this volatility if they want to meet their lifestyle goals. However, even 10 years is a long investment horizon, let alone 30, so with time on their side they should be able to ride out any market downturns.

And there’s another safety net. The above calculations ignore any age pension. As Dave and Linda draw down on their savings they will probably qualify for some age pension. Not only will this offset some of the investment risk, it will substantially extend the date when their savings will eventually be exhausted.

Helpful advice

Establishing a well diversified, considered portfolio is a little more complex than setting up a conservative portfolio. It will also require more active monitoring and regular review. On top of that individual circumstances can change quickly, particularly in older age.

For help with all aspects of retirement planning, including portfolio design, establishment of income streams and age pension strategy talk to your qualified financial adviser.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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8 Tips to help your children succeed financially

All / 28.11.2019

8 Tips to help your children succeed financially

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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