What is a market index and how might it affect your investments?

All / 22.02.20180 comments

What is a market index and how might it affect your investments?

Investors who pay attention to the finance segment of the daily news may be gazing in awe at the performance of the US share market. Even taking into account the fall in early February, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has risen 30% in the last 12 months. Meanwhile, the Australian All Ordinaries Index has yet to return to the height it enjoyed before the Global Financial Crisis at 6779.1 points.

This begs two questions: what are these indices? And what do their movements tell us about our investments?

What’s an index?

A share market index is a simple way of tracking the relative changes in the total value of the shares that are included in that index. There are many different indices covering particular national markets, as well as sectors such as large companies, small companies, financials, resources, technology companies and many more.

Capital indices – the type featured on the news each day – simply track the total market value of the companies in the index. This means the largest companies tend to dominate an index’s movements. Indices commonly appearing in news reports include the Australian All Ordinaries Index, comprising Australia’s largest 500 companies; the ASX 200 (Australia’s 200 largest companies); the US Dow Jones Industrial Index that tracks just 30 large industrial companies; and the US S&P 500 consisting America’s 500 largest companies. The NASDAQ is focused on technology stocks and can perform quite differently to the other US indices.

Capital indices ignore the contribution of dividends to the overall performance of the shares that they track. Accumulation indices are calculated on the basis that the dividends paid by each company are re-invested back into that company. They therefore measure compounding returns, and over time this makes a huge difference to the measured performance of the basket of shares. For example, the Australian ASX 200 accumulation index is well ahead of its pre-GFC peak.

This also explains one difference between the perceived performance of the Australian share market relative to the US market. American-based companies pay very low dividends compared to Australian companies. Retained earnings add to a company’s value, so US indices behave a bit more like accumulation indices than their Australian counterparts.

What do the index movements mean for your investments?

What the movement of a particular index tells you about the performance of your share portfolio depends on how closely the two match. If you are invested in an index fund that tracks the ASX 200, then naturally the changes in the value of the index will closely match the performance of your holding in that fund.

However, the Australian share market is dominated by a small number of very large companies. If the big banks are having a bad day the whole index is likely to fall, even if resources have had a good day. If your focus is on the miners, this change in the index may not tell you much about how your shares are performing.

Of course, if you’re following the golden rule of investment – diversification – your precious savings and superannuation will be invested in both Australian and international share markets as well as cash, fixed interest and property. Any given index can then only affect the performance of a part of your portfolio. Nonetheless, if you’re like most people, you’ll want to see the share market arrows on the TV pointing up and not down each day!

Australia vs the world

But why is Australia lagging other markets, particularly the US? One reason is the ‘Trump factor’, and his promise of a very large cut to the company tax rate. This will allow American companies to invest more of their earnings into growing their businesses and increasing their value. Also, Australia has a relatively small technology sector. The US has Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon – huge companies that didn’t exist a few decades ago. The massive investment that drove Australia’s mining boom is now past, and after growing strongly from their GFC lows, the banks have taken a bit of a breather.

Coping with market ups and downs

Another golden rule of investment is that past performance is no indicator of future performance. Indices go up, and as we’ve just experienced, they go down, usually suddenly. For advice on how to keep your cool during market gyrations talk to your financial adviser.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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How to make your term deposits work harder

All / 22.02.20180 comments

How to make your term deposits work harder

In 2011, the average term deposit could earn you around 6 percent per annum. Since then, the times, they have a-changed – and so have term deposit rates.

Since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) we remain a little nervous around risk, so despite average term deposit rates now being closer to 2.5 percent, they’re included in financial portfolios for the capital security and diversification components they offer.

The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) sets the cash rate via its monetary policy. The aim is to stimulate the economy by making savings accounts and term deposits unattractive and make borrowing cheap to encourage consumers to spend.

Generally this kind of monetary policy only lasts a couple of years which is why so few economists foresaw the protracted period of low rates we are experiencing.

Term deposits can pay slightly higher rates depending on the length of the term. For example, investment over one year may attract 2.45 percent, while over two years the same investment may attract 2.5 percent.

Bonus saver accounts offer investors more attractive rates but you must read the fine print or better still, seek independent professional advice before committing. You could find that the ‘bonus’ may only apply for a short introductory period then revert to the standard cash rate, potentially lower than term deposit rates.

In other cases, bonus rates are only paid if a regular monthly contribution is made to the savings account.

Many people find these features work in their favour, but there can be traps for the unwary.

So if you’ve done your homework, and term deposits remain the most appropriate fixed interest investment for you, there are a few things you can do to maximise their potential.

Loyalty may get you nowhere

We Australians are a loyal bunch usually letting our insurance policies automatically renew each year – same with term deposits. Each time yours approaches maturity, shop around and see what other term deposits are available that will work better for you.

Eggs and baskets

Consider spreading your allocated funds across a variety of institutions with a staggered range of maturity dates. This might enable you to take advantage of better rates as your investments mature.

Interest payments

Many term deposits offer the earnings as a regular income, sometimes resulting in a lower interest rate. Consider reinvesting the interest for a higher rate, or, if you need some income, set up separate term deposits.

Set and forget

Term deposits are not everyday transaction accounts. While it’s possible to access money before the end of the term, it’s not advisable as heavy penalties apply, including fees and reduced interest rates.

As with any financial decision, it’s important to seek advice from a licensed adviser to ensure you’re getting the best product and the best deal for you. For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.
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How much money do you throw away?

All / 01.02.20180 comments

While the move is on to become a cashless society, notes and coins are likely to be with us for some time yet. ‘Touch and go’ payments may be increasing, but for many small purchases most of us still rely on good old cash. And because it’s easier to hand over a note for each purchase than to scramble in our pockets or purses for the correct change, by the end of the week we often end up with a hefty pile of low value coins. These coins are such a pain that, according to one survey, 93% of respondents admitted to throwing away five cent pieces, with 29% even ditching ten cent pieces.

Okay, so tossing away a dollar’s worth of small change each week won’t put much of a dent in your future wealth, but at least consider dropping those coins into a donation box. Combined with thousands of other peoples’ donations your spare change can make a real difference to the services that charities provide.

There are, however, other areas where we effectively throw away money, and in amounts that can really add up:

  • Food: on average Australians throw away around one third of the food we buy.
  • Gas and electricity: when was the last time you shopped around for the best deal on your gas and power bills? You could save hundreds of dollars a year.
  • Gift cards: often end up at the back of a drawer until they expire, or you may only spend part of the total value.
  • Impulse buying: how much do you spend on clothing you don’t wear and stuff you don’t use?
  • Lunches: even if you skip the smashed avo, a takeaway lunch costs much more than one you make yourself.

In most of these cases the solutions are pretty obvious.

  • Only buy the food you will use. A few loose carrots and apples might be a better buy than the kilo bags that start to rot in the crisper. If you regularly have a surplus of some foods find recipes that use them. Soups and casseroles are a great way to use up all sorts of ingredients.
  • Compare what other gas and electricity retailers are offering.
  • Have a good look at your credit card statement. Were all your purchases necessary?
  • Place your gift cards in front of your credit cards to remind you to use them instead.
  • Make your own lunch. Many people can easily save $10 or $15 dollars per day with very little effort. Once any impulse buying habits are under control, this could be the supercharger of your savings.

Will implementing these changes make a real difference? Let’s see.

Imagine that you adopt some of these suggestions and as a result save an average of $60 per week. Stashed away in a savings account earning an interest rate of 2% per annum for 20 years, those modest weekly savings will grow to over $76,700. Contributed to an investment that provides an average return of 7% pa and you could be looking at having around $136,000 in 20 years’ time.

Does that give you a better idea of how much money you could really be throwing away?

What to do with your newfound savings capacity will depend on your goals and situation. Your financial adviser will be able to help you make the most of the money you don’t throw away.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.


Disclaimer

Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

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Financial planning is for everyone

All / 25.01.20180 comments

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Start planning early to get what you want!

All / 19.01.20180 comments

Australians are living longer. According to the World Health Organization, we enjoy the fourth best life expectancy in the world behind Japan, Switzerland and Singapore.

Great news for Millennials! Your life expectancy has been tabled at 74 for men and 80 for women. Astounding advances in medical technology could mean you will live much longer! With all that living to be done, how on earth will you fund it?

Well there’s always the Bank of Mum and Dad, right?

Doubtful, you see, according to a 2017 joint survey by National Seniors Australia and Challenger, the main issue concerning older people is ensuring they have regular and sufficient income.

This is because they are also living longer and are structuring their affairs to ensure they don’t outlive their savings. Your parents are healthier and more financially savvy than their own parents were and they’re considering their options.

It might seem like an historical event now, but self-funded retirees took an unexpected hit during the Global Financial Crisis (GFC). Ten years on, and investments have still not recovered. A recent report by the SuperGuide announced the top-performing super fund for the last ten years to June 2017 earned an average of 6.1%. That’s not much.

It’s probably not a good idea to rely on an inheritance either. From the survey mentioned above, only 3 percent of respondents planned to leave their savings to their children.

A combination of longer life expectancy and sluggish investment growth has seen many retirees opting for strategies like downsizing their homes to supplement retirement income.

It’s common to live with Mum and Dad to save a healthy home deposit. Sometimes parents even offer financial assistance to give their children a leg-up into their first home. As a result, it’s quite reasonable to assume there’ll be further help later on.

These days, it’s increasingly likely that you’ll find your parents are simply not in the position to give further help, much as they’d like to.

But independence is empowering! It means taking control.

Borrowing from family can be awkward; they may want a say in how you spend the money, or it can leave you feeling you must consult them before making decisions.

Controlling your own destiny might be challenging, but financial self-reliance is rewarding. You just need to know where to start.

Financial advisers consider your income, expenses and financial goals. They work with you to tailor a plan to manage debt and develop a good savings habit to put you on track to getting what you want.

Contribute even the smallest regular amount and you’ll be amazed at what you can achieve.

This is because interest is calculated on your savings balance. Regularly topping-up your balance – even once a month – really boosts your savings as the interest combined with your contributions compound one on top of the other, over and over. It’s like free money!

What could be better? Only the fact that professional advice costs less than you might expect.

So, next time you need a favour from your parents, why not surprise them by asking for a referral to their financial adviser?

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

 

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

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The Multitasking Effect

All / 15.01.20180 comments

There’s an old joke about scientists discovering something that could do the work of two men. One woman.

The implication was that women are better at doing two or more things at once than men, now referred to as ‘multitasking’, and there is some science to back this up. Even so, and regardless of gender, there’s also plenty of evidence that multitasking isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

The downside

We don’t need to look too far to see why we multitask. If it isn’t our gadgets that are constantly crying out for our attention, it’s the boss or colleagues, clients, customers and kids. But every time our attention is drawn to a new email, message or phone call, there’s a switching cost. The upshot is that multitasking reduces productivity.

Perhaps you’re different – a gifted multitasker? Sorry. Research has shown that people who multitask a lot and who feel it boosts their performance are actually worse at multitasking. They are slower to switch between tasks and have more trouble organising their thoughts than people who prefer to focus on one thing at a time.

If that’s not bad enough, there are even suggestions that multitasking can lower your IQ as well as your emotional intelligence. Bear in mind though, many of these conclusions are based on laboratory studies with contrived tasks. They may not always reflect the real world.

The upside

We all need to multitask to some extent, whether it involves frequently switching between tasks or doing two things at once.

Listening to a podcast while driving is an efficient use of time. Call centre workers and receptionists have no choice but to constantly switch from one task to another. For our ancestors, hunting for a daily meal while not being eaten by lions was essential to survival. And even if it does reduce your productivity, being seen to be a good multitasker may pay dividends at work (just don’t mention the pesky science to your boss).

The antidote

Like everything in life, multitasking needs to be undertaken with a degree of balance. With so many demands on our attention, one of the biggest problems is that we often aren’t even aware that we are multitasking. But if you automatically reach for your phone every time it pings you need to develop some healthier habits.

When you have a task to complete that requires concentration find a way to block distractions and interruptions. Some offices have quiet times and spaces for this purpose. Listening to music can help concentration. Wear big headphones and you’ll also deter interruption.

Learn to differentiate between what’s urgent and important, urgent but not important, important but not urgent, and neither urgent nor important. Your priorities will then be much clearer.

Relish ‘flow’. This is the state of absorbed concentration when you are truly at your most productive and time passes unnoticed. And if you are having an important conversation, turn off your phone or set it to silent, and give the other person 100% of your attention.

If you’re not sure if you’re a good multitasker or not, what else did you do while reading this short article?!

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.


Disclaimer

Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

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6 ways to master your debt

All / 15.01.20180 comments

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You CAN afford a holiday

All / 15.01.20180 comments

Are TV travel documentaries not close up and personal enough for you? Would you prefer to actually be there, immersing yourself in the environment, amongst the people, eating local delicacies, but you’re not sure if your budget can take you further than your lounge room?

An overseas holiday doesn’t have to be outrageously expensive, especially if you follow these money saving tips. You may be surprised how far your money can take you.

Research your options

  • Shop around. Go online and find the best deals without leaving your mouse. Seeking expert advice from a travel agent could also save you time.
  • Consider a travel package which includes flights, accommodation and meals. Often packages are cheaper than purchasing each component individually.
  • Choose a destination that doesn’t have a big impact on your budget. South East Asia, New Zealand and the South Pacific are cost-effective destinations for Australian travellers.
  • Consider choosing a venue that offers free activities, such as an island resort.

Time your travel

  • The weather doesn’t seem to follow the same patterns these days, so travelling off season may be a good option to save on flights and accommodation and still enjoy good weather.
  • Plan your trip well in advance and book early. The closer you get to your departure date, the more expensive travel costs are likely to be.
  • School holidays coincide with higher costs, as well as bigger crowds. If you don’t have to travel with children, steer clear of these times.

Save money on flights

  • Make the most of discounted flights but check terms and conditions carefully. “Discount” airfares have “add-ons” such as paying for seat allocation and luggage which make the promoted fare much higher.
  • Subscribe to the airlines’ “special deal” emails and act fast. There are restrictions on travel dates but the savings can be extraordinary if you’re flexible.

Be budget savvy with accommodation

  • Check out discount travel websites. Type “discount travel” into your favourite search engine. The choice is astounding – but stick to the more well-known and reputable sites.
  • Rent a fully-equipped holiday home or a serviced apartment rather than staying in a hotel.
  • Consider staying several nights in one location to take advantage of discounted weekly rates or deals like “buy 5 nights, get 2 nights free”.
  • Better still, arrange to house-sit or house-swap at your holiday destination and your accommodation could be free! There are many websites available offering these services.

With these money-saving tips, the most expensive thing you’ll do for your next overseas trip is renew your passport!

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.


Disclaimer

Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

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Make this year a financially healthy one

All / 15.01.20180 comments

Another year is over – how was it for you? Did you achieve everything you’d hoped?

Are you better or worse off financially than you were this time last year?

With a new year in front of you, what can you do to make the most of every moment?

We’ve put together a guide to get you started.

January to March

Make a start by turning wishes into goals. Some might be long-term like becoming debt-free, saving a home deposit, or retiring in a few years’ time. What can you do this year to support those goals? Write it all down and give it a name – something you can own.

At the same time, don’t forget living for now. Prepare a month-by-month budget that makes room for the fun times – holidays and celebrations – as well as covering the necessities.

Anticipate spikes in your spending. Do your car, home and life insurance premiums all seem to fall due at the same time? Investigate monthly premium payments, or spreading renewal dates across the year.

Use this first quarter to bed down the budgeting habit and track your actual spending against your plan.

At the end of March, do a quick review of your progress so far and make adjustments if necessary.

April to June

It’s time to prepare for the end of financial year (EOFY). By June 30 you will want to have made any intended additional superannuation contributions (make sure you stay within relevant limits) and finalised donations to your favourite charities.

Is there any other tax-deductible expenditure you can bring forward?

June is also the month for EOFY sales – an opportunity to grab some bargains on early Christmas shopping and birthday gift purchases. Don’t forget to include these in your budget.

July to September

If you’re expecting a tax refund for the financial year just finished, lodge your tax return early.

What are you going to do with the windfall? Whether you put it towards one of your goals or blow it on a big night out is up to you. Just make sure it’s part of The Plan.

With your tax return out of the way, the third quarter is a good time to start a bit of financial spring-cleaning. Review your super and savings, insurance and will, loans and credit cards, power of attorney, and overall financial strategy. Is everything up to date?

How’s your super doing? Would salary-sacrificing help?

Can you consolidate debt or refinance at a lower rate?

October to December

Into the final strait and how are you tracking? Are you ‘on plan’?

Maybe the plan you came up with back in January wasn’t realistic. It’s not too late to adjust both your strategy and your expectations.

If things are looking good, it’s important to stay focused. Christmas is looming with its temptations to over-spend.

Once the turkey and plum pudding have settled, it’s time to review the year just gone and to give yourself a pat on the back for what you’ve achieved. Then take a deep breath, check your goals, and update your plan for the coming year.

Invaluable help

Your financial adviser is an expert in working out the financial details of how you can achieve your goals. Just as important is the regular encouragement they can provide along the way.

Ready to start planning? Give your adviser a call and make a date to nut out your plan for the coming year.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.


Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

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Service your future regularly

All / 13.12.20170 comments

Most of us take for granted that we have to get our car serviced regularly. It’s not something we look forward to, but we know we have to do it – or it will let us down when we most need it.

A regular review of your financial plan is just as important – and for the same reason. Life changes so quickly we can forget important updates to our financial planning, particularly insurance as shown by this real life event.

Josh and Kate had their first child late last year. A close friend who knew Josh was quite casual about finance matters reminded him that their circumstances had now drastically changed. He suggested it would be a good idea to talk to his financial adviser about their insurance situation given their newfound responsibilities.

The adviser discovered that Josh and Kate had last updated their life insurance when they bought their first home three years previously. He emphasised that with the new baby, things had changed dramatically for the couple, and having insurance that only covered their mortgage would leave a shortfall should something happen to one of them.

When it was suggested they increase their cover from $250,000 (the mortgage) to $750,000, Josh was stunned! But then the adviser explained: should something happen to Josh, $400,000 would be drawn down over the long term to replace his income and allow Kate to look after their son. Otherwise she could use these funds to hire a nanny if she went back to work. Part of the remaining lump sum could be invested for their son’s future education – this being one of their current savings goals that they would not want to change.

This one option removed considerable pressure from Josh and Kate in their new roles as parents.  Having appropriate life insurance in place gives you and your family options should the unthinkable occur.

Does your financial plan need reviewing?

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

 

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.

Read More >>
 
  • What is a market index and how might it affect your investments?

    What is a market index and how might it affect your investments? Investors who pay attention to the finance segment of the daily news may be gazing in awe at the performance of the US share market. Even taking into account the fall in early February, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has risen 30% in […]

  • How to make your term deposits work harder

    How to make your term deposits work harder In 2011, the average term deposit could earn you around 6 percent per annum. Since then, the times, they have a-changed – and so have term deposit rates. Since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) we remain a little nervous around risk, so despite average term deposit rates […]

  • How much money do you throw away?

    While the move is on to become a cashless society, notes and coins are likely to be with us for some time yet. ‘Touch and go’ payments may be increasing, but for many small purchases most of us still rely on good old cash. And because it’s easier to hand over a note for each […]

  • Financial planning is for everyone

  • Start planning early to get what you want!

    Australians are living longer. According to the World Health Organization, we enjoy the fourth best life expectancy in the world behind Japan, Switzerland and Singapore. Great news for Millennials! Your life expectancy has been tabled at 74 for men and 80 for women. Astounding advances in medical technology could mean you will live much longer! […]

TNR Wealth Management