Why it just got harder to get a home loan

All / 18.07.2019

Why it just got harder to get a home loan

Anyone applying for a home loan these days will find that there are more hurdles to jump than has recently been the case. So why is it harder to get a home loan? And what can you do to improve your chances of getting a loan?

The Royal Commission

The Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry that concluded in early 2019 discovered a number of lax lending practices by some of Australia’s biggest lenders. Of particular concern was that some banks failed to verify the living expenses of home loan applicants. In many cases this lead to people receiving loans that they were unable to repay. The Royal Commission also revealed that one of the bank regulators, ASIC, did little to punish misconduct, so there was little incentive for banks to comply with their legal obligations.

In response to the Royal Commission ASIC promised greater scrutiny of lending practices and lenders began to ask for a lot more information when assessing home loan applications. They now require detailed proof of both income and expenditure at a level that many people may find intrusive.

Bigger deposits

The decline in home prices in Australia’s major cities mean that buyers don’t need to borrow as much for a given property, which should make it easier to get a loan. However, falling prices create a greater risk for the banks, and one way to reduce this risk is to require a higher deposit, extending the time it takes to save that deposit.

Stringent stress testing

Even before the Royal Commission the prudential bank regulator, APRA, introduced a requirement that banks check on their borrowers’ ability to service their loans if there is a significant increase in interest rates. While it might be possible to borrow at an interest rate of less than 4% per annum (pa), the banks need to check that the loan is still affordable at an interest rate of more than 7% pa, thus reducing the amount that can be borrowed.

Being prepared

The main response to this more difficult lending environment is simple, but that doesn’t make it pleasant. Unless you are able to increase your income, you’ll need to save more. Inevitably, that means spending less:

  • Apps such as TrackMySPEND from MoneySmart can help you track your spending and make it easier to work to a budget.
  • Keep detailed records of saving and spending. You will be asked for them come loan application time.
  • Start early. You are more likely to be successful in your home loan quest if you can show a consistent history of saving and responsible spending spanning years rather than months.
  • Shop around. By all means start with your regular bank, but also check out what the non-bank lenders and mortgage brokers can offer.

For more information or to speak to one of our Financial Advisers please contact TNR Wealth Management on 02 6621 8544.

Disclaimer
Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. The information and any advice in this publication does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs and so you should consider its appropriateness having regard to these factors before acting on it. This article may contain material provided directly by third parties and is given in good faith and has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but has not been independently verified. It is important that your personal circumstances are taken into account before making any financial decision and we recommend you seek detailed and specific advice from a suitably qualified adviser before acting on any information or advice in this publication. Any taxation position described in this publication is general and should only be used as a guide. It does not constitute tax advice and is based on current laws and our interpretation. You should consult a registered tax agent for specific tax advice on your circumstances.